Colorado Springs man fears being trapped in home by cracked sidewalk

Published: December 6, 2013, 8:00 am, by Bill Vogrin
The public sidewalk in front of Duncan MacDonald's home on Ute Drive is cracked, heaving and flaking away. Twice, MacDonald has rescued people in wheelchairs who became trapped on the sidewalk. Now he fears he'll be trapped in his home as he uses a wheelchair due to declining health. Bill Vogrin / The Gazette

The public sidewalk in front of Duncan MacDonald’s home on Ute Drive is cracked, heaving and flaking away. Twice, MacDonald has rescued people in wheelchairs who became trapped on the sidewalk. Now he fears he’ll be trapped in his home as he uses a wheelchair due to declining health. Bill Vogrin / The Gazette

For years, Duncan MacDonald tried to patch the public sidewalk in front of his little bungalow.

But his patches failed and the concrete cracked and heaved and flaked away, creating a trap for anyone in a wheelchair in front of his home near Fillmore Street and Templeton Gap Road.

Over the years, Duncan MacDonald has tried to patch the sidewalk in front of his home on Ute Drive. The sidewalk is cracked, heaving and flaking away. Twice, MacDonald has rescued people in wheelchairs who became trapped on the sidewalk. Now he fears he'll be trapped in his home as he uses a wheelchair due to declining health. Bill Vogrin / The Gazette

Over the years, Duncan MacDonald has tried to patch the sidewalk in front of his home on Ute Drive. The sidewalk is cracked, heaving and flaking away. Twice, MacDonald has rescued people in wheelchairs who became trapped on the sidewalk. Now he fears he’ll be trapped in his home as he uses a wheelchair due to declining health. Bill Vogrin / The Gazette

“My sidewalk is a mess,” MacDonald said. “Twice I’ve rescued people in a wheelchair who got stuck out there.

“And there’s another fellow who rides in the street in his wheelchair to avoid our sidewalk.”

MacDonald hoped the city would fix the problem after Colorado Springs voters passed the one-cent sales tax in 2004 to fund the Pikes Peak Rural Transportation Authority.

In selling the tax to voters, the city agreed to take responsibility for maintaining sidewalks, curbs and gutters using tax proceeds.

And, in fact, the city has repaired or replaced an amazing number of sidewalks, curbs and gutters since using PPRTA funds. The street division reports that since 2006, it has fixed 109.6 miles of curb and gutter, 3,811 pedestrian ramps, 13,621 “trip hazards” where sidewalks have heaved creating dangerous conditions, and a whopping 54.1 miles of sidewalk.

The public sidewalk in front of Duncan MacDonald's home on Ute Drive is cracked, heaving and flaking away. Twice, MacDonald has rescued people in wheelchairs who became trapped on the sidewalk. Now he fears he'll be trapped in his home as he uses a wheelchair due to declining health. Bill Vogrin / The Gazette

The public sidewalk in front of Duncan MacDonald’s home on Ute Drive is cracked, heaving and flaking away. Twice, MacDonald has rescued people in wheelchairs who became trapped on the sidewalk. Now he fears he’ll be trapped in his home as he uses a wheelchair due to declining health. Bill Vogrin / The Gazette

After the tax passed, MacDonald dutifully reported his sidewalk to the city and waited for crews to show.

He’s still waiting even though he’s called back several times seeking help.

Mike Chaves, a senior civil engineer for the city, said MacDonald hasn’t been forgotten. His sidewalk was evaluated in 2005 and 2007 and remains on the waiting list.

“We’re slowly getting to everyone,” Chaves said.

Unfortunately, that waiting list is long with lots of folks like MacDonald. While dozens of miles of sidewalk have been fixed, there are 2,362 miles of curb and gutter and sidewalk in the city. And many of them are cracked and heaving and flaking.

Duncan MacDonald stands amid his cracked, heaving and flaking sidewalk on Ute Drive on Dec. 3, 2013. Twice, MacDonald has rescued people in wheelchairs who became trapped on the sidewalk. Now he fears he'll be trapped in his home as he uses a wheelchair due to declining health. Bill Vogrin / The Gazette

Duncan MacDonald stands amid his cracked, heaving and flaking sidewalk on Ute Drive on Dec. 3, 2013. Twice, MacDonald has rescued people in wheelchairs who became trapped on the sidewalk. Now he fears he’ll be trapped in his home as he uses a wheelchair due to declining health. Bill Vogrin / The Gazette

MacDonald has patiently waited for his name to reach the top of the list. But he’s getting concerned because the next person in a wheelchair who gets stuck in the sidewalk may be MacDonald.

“I’m disabled now,” said MacDonald, an 86-year-old retired builder and inspector.

He explained that he suffers a degenerative lung disease that requires constant oxygen and a walker to get around.

“I’m going to need a wheelchair but I won’t be able to get out of my house in it,” he said, shaking his head. “I need to replace the sidewalk to my front door, too. But they can’t do it until the city fixes the public sidewalk out front.

“I couldn’t get off my own property in a wheelchair.”

The public sidewalk in front of Duncan MacDonald's home on Ute Drive is cracked, heaving and flaking away. Twice, MacDonald has rescued people in wheelchairs who became trapped on the sidewalk. Now he fears he'll be trapped in his home as he uses a wheelchair due to declining health. Bill Vogrin / The Gazette

The public sidewalk in front of Duncan MacDonald’s home on Ute Drive is cracked, heaving and flaking away. Twice, MacDonald has rescued people in wheelchairs who became trapped on the sidewalk. Now he fears he’ll be trapped in his home as he uses a wheelchair due to declining health. Bill Vogrin / The Gazette

When I told Chaves that MacDonald may be trapped in his home by the sidewalks, the engineer said he may be able to bump him to the top of the list.

“Handicapped accessibility is one of the criteria we look at,” Chaves said. “It’s a priority.”

A couple days later, Chaves called me back with good news.

“I think we can get something going for him after the first of the year,” Chaves said. “We looked at the extenuating circumstances — the fact he’s disabled and can’t use a wheelchair on the sidewalk.

“We’re going to go fix that sidewalk for him.”

Of course the work is weather-dependent. And it will have to be scheduled with a city contractor.

But Chaves said MacDonald will not be waiting years for help.

“We’ll be there in the near future,” he said. “We’ll make an effort to get in there as quickly as possible.”

Hopefully MacDonald may have made his last wheelchair rescue in front of his home.

120613 Side Streets 5

The public sidewalk in front of Duncan MacDonald’s home on Ute Drive is cracked, heaving and flaking away. Twice, MacDonald has rescued people in wheelchairs who became trapped on the sidewalk. Now he fears he’ll be trapped in his home as he uses a wheelchair due to declining health. Bill Vogrin / The Gazette

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