2014 Pulitzer Prize Winner

Lockheed Martin moving Korean aircraft work to Springs

Published: March 19, 2014, 2:01 pm, by Wayne Heilman
The U.S. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center has exercised a $9 million option with Lockheed Martin Corp. to continue maintaining South Korea's Peace Krypton reconnaissance aircraft system. Much of the work on the contract is moving from Goodyear, Ariz., to Colorado Springs.

The U.S. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center has exercised a $9 million option with Lockheed Martin Corp. to continue maintaining South Korea’s Peace Krypton reconnaissance aircraft system. Much of the work on the contract is moving from Goodyear, Ariz., to Colorado Springs.

Lockheed Martin Corp.is moving a team of 25-30 people to Colorado Springs from an operation in Goodyear, Ariz., that the military contracting giant is closing.

The employees have been working on an Air Force contract to maintain South Korea’s Peace Krypton reconnaissance aircraft system, and they’ll continue to do so in Colorado Springs.

The move is expected to be completed over the next several months, saidĀ Suzanne Smith, a Lockheed Martin spokeswoman in the Denver area. The company is closing the entire 600-employee Arizona operation, which develops software for military sensors and communications missions, early next year because of declining federal government spending. Much of the work is being moved to the Denver area and Valley Forge, Pa.

The Arizona closing is part of reductions and facility closures affecting 4,000 people in Goodyear; Sunnyvale, Calif.; Akron, Ohio; Newtown, Pa., and Horizon City, Texas.

U.S. Air Force Life Cycle Management Center last month exercised a $9 million option for Lockheed Martin to continue to maintain the Peace Krypton system; the company hopes to win a new three-year contract for the work by early next year. AboutĀ  80 percent of the work on the contract is completed by the team in Goodyear with the rest performed by Lockheed Martin personnel in South Korea, Smith said.

The Peace Krypton system is used for tactical intelligence and is made up of militarized business jets and ground stations that process data from the aircraft. The contract includes maintaining the fleet, keeping an inventory of spare parts and providing support and test equipment for the aircraft and ground stations. The company also will develop and upgrade software to modernize the reconnaissance system.